Well, two years after complaining about how I’d made it too difficult to post anything to my blog, I’ve decided to just move the whole thing back to WordPress. Hopefully this will be simple enough to encourage me to write more stuff here. We’ll see.

The first order or business is to figure out how to get my archive of posts from the last blog imported into this one. Should be interesting.

I had an idea for a short micro post, went to my Mac to write it.

20 minutes later, after fixing an issue with rbenv, separating micro-posts from full posts, fixing the build system, etc. I’ve forgotten what I was going to post.

Perhaps my blogging system is too complex.

Perhaps I would blog more if there wasn’t so much friction.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Jim Schutze, on the upcomming city council election for Dallas District 14:

Wood’s waffling on the [Trinity River] park plan is concerning, but I’m too embarrassed to offer it here as a serious argument for anything, because that would be just too East Dallas deep-in-the-weeds hillbilly, and nobody outside of District 14 would even get it.

So let’s say this. The city is on the very verge of a huge change, a generational turnover of power and culture. That’s the hat. District 14 voters will have to make up their minds on that basis. And then we can cut each other’s noses off — that’s the part we really live for anyway.

There seems to be a philosophical disconnect between the two (broadly generalizing) sides of the health care debate. The technical way to frame the debates is this: should health care be an entitlement or not? In other words, should it be something everyone deserves to have provided for them, or should it be something that is sold according to free market rules. I use to be on the free market side of this debate, but I have since shifted to the entitlement side. If I were to distill the reason why I changed my mind, it’s this: When someone dies from a medical condition that could have been treated but wasn’t because they couldn’t afford the treatment, what is your reaction? If it’s, “well maybe that’s not a good thing, but it is fair and just,” then that places you on the free market side of the debate. If, on the other hand, that situation strikes you as unfair and unjust, then you are on the entitlement side.

Lent is a time for discipline, for confession, for honesty, not because God is mean or fault-finding or finger-pointing but because he wants us to know the joy of being cleaned out, ready for all the good things he now has in store.

N. T. Wright, Lent for Everyone: Matthew, Year A (pp. 13-14).